Decarceral public health

Decarceral public health

Mass criminalization and mass incarceration, which disproportionately target poor people and people of color, tear through every aspect of social life, from public health and education to housing, labor markets, the opioid epidemic, and the climate emergency. These policies destroy communities and the networks of care and support required to lead productive, healthy lives, without offering long-term economic benefit, security, or safety. My research integrates advanced epidemiologic methods with sociological, critical criminological, and abolitionist theory to document and explain the collateral public health consequences of mass criminalization and incarceration. I am the principal investigator of a National Institute on Drug Abuse K01 grant to study the role of adolescent substance use as determinant and consequence of the school-to- prison pipeline. Other projects include research on the theoretical and methodological assumptions underlying risk assessment in the criminal legal system, and the impact of jail incarceration rates on county mortality.

Association between County Jail Incarceration and Cause-Specific County Mortality in the USA, 1987– 2017: A Retrospective, Longitudinal Study

Background Mass incarceration has collateral consequences for community health, which are reflected in county-level health indicators, including county mortality rates. County jail incarceration rates are associated with all-cause mortality rates in …

Connecting the Dots Between Mass Incarceration, Health Inequity, and Climate Change

County Jail Incarceration Rates and County Mortality Rates in the United States, 1987– 2016

Objectives. To evaluate the relationship between changes in county jail incarceration rates and subsequent county mortality rates across the United States.Methods. We analyzed county jail incarceration rates from the Bureau of Justice Statistics from …

The Disciplining Effect of Mass Incarceration on Labor Organization

Previous research has described the criminal justice system as a “labor market institution.” In recent years, however, research on the relationship between the criminal justice system and the labor market has focused primarily on the negative impact …

Criminogenic or Criminalized? Testing an Assumption for Expanding Criminogenic Risk Assessment

OBJECTIVES: Proponents of criminogenic risk assessment have called for its widespread expansion throughout the criminal justice system. Its success in predicting recidivism is taken as evidence that criminogenic risks tap into the causes of criminal …

Can We Avoid Reductionism in Risk Reduction?

Risk assessment and risk reduction have become increasingly central to criminal justice policy and practice in the last 25 years. Yet there remains a lack of consensus both on the theoretical and methodological foundations of risk and on its social …

Criminogenic Factors, Psychotic Symptoms, and Incident Arrests among People with Serious Mental Illnesses under Intensive Outpatient Treatment

Although research robustly indicates that general or "criminogenic" factors predict various measures of recidivism, there is controversy about the extent to which these factors, versus untreated symptoms, lead to justice involvement for people with …

Prevalence of Mental Illnesses in U.S. State Prisons: A Systematic Review

ObjectivePeople with mental illnesses are understood to be overrepresented in the U.S. criminal justice system, and accurate prevalence estimates in corrections settings are crucial for planning and implementing preventive and diversionary policies …

Exploring Racial Disparities in The Brief Jail Mental Health Screen

The authors analyzed validation data from the Brief Jail Mental Health Screen (BJMHS) to determine whether race predicted screening results and if such a prediction was driven by particular screen items. A total of 22,000 individuals entering five …